AGENDA

EXCEL LONDON 

19-21 JANUARY 2022

For 2022, attendance at Learnit is prioritised for educator leaders taking part in our Hosted Leaders Programme. To find out more, check your eligibility and save your spot, visit the dedicated Hosted Leaders Programme page.

Registration open

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Breakfast is served

Hosted Leader Meetings

Connecting global educator leaders and technology companies through curated pre-selected, 1:1 meetings.

Tech in the
classroom

The Covid-19 pandemic pushed technology in the classroom from a nice-to-have to must-have. What tech remains after the pandemic as a useful addition to what happens in education? And in what ways could tech still disrupt or enhance the way we deliver teaching and learning?

Widening the net:
private schools head
online

Even before the pandemic, elite private school brands had taken their lessons online for their existing students across the globe. Now, they are looking at whether they could go further with their platforms: delivering an online-only education, extending their reach and offering a chance to attend an exclusive institution from the comfort of a student’s home. But is this model viable? What does it mean for teacher workload? And do some of the main benefits of a private education (especially when it comes to networking) get lost in the move to online?

Moderator

Katy Fryatt, Founder, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Neelam Parmar, Director of Digital Learning & Education, AISL Harrow Schools (Hong Kong)

John Gwyn Jones, CEO, FOBISIA (Singapore)

John Short Ring, Deputy Head, King’s College School Wimbledon (United Kingdom)

Mental health and wellbeing

Schools, universities, startups, established businesses and local communities are forming varied partnerships that are revolutionising access to the best careers. These new alliances are rethinking how public and private institutions can work together, and how we can best support learners.

Not a piece of cake:
preventing teacher
burnout

Teacher attrition rates in many countries are alarming, with many citing burnout as a key reason why they are choosing to leave the classroom. While some school leaders have chosen to provide cake and tea or mindfulness sessions for staff, some wonder if this will really address the roots of why teachers are exiting the profession – and will it prove to be enough post-Covid-19? Leaders explain what they are doing to put the wellbeing and mental health of their staff first.

Moderator

Sarah Cunnane, Content Director, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Ellen Mahoney, CEO, Sea Change Mentoring (United States) 

Yuli Tamir, Head, Beit Berl (Israel)

Changing the
system

The divide between school and home became blurrier during lockdown, with many parents having to share the workload of teaching their children. How can schools take advantage of that time and that altered relationship to ensure long-term parental engagement and to change the way in which they communicate and work with parents and carers?

London calling: Ed Vainker and Louisa Mitchell on education and community

Ed Vainker founded Reach Academy to meet the needs of families in Feltham, one of London’s most deprived areas. Louisa Mitchell revitalized the West London Zone to make sure the most marginalised students’ needs are met, and that information and data about those kids are fed back to schools. Ed and Louisa discuss the challenges of gentrification and what it takes to prevent high-risk students from falling through the cracks.

Moderator

Jenny Anderson, Author & Host, Learnit Podcast
(United Kingdom)

Speakers

Louisa Mitchell, Chief Executive, West London Zone for Children and Young People (United Kingdom)

Ed Vainker, CEO, Reach Foundation (United Kingdom)

Tech in the
classroom

The Covid-19 pandemic pushed technology in the classroom from a nice-to-have to must-have. What tech remains after the pandemic as a useful addition to what happens in education? And in what ways could tech still disrupt or enhance the way we deliver teaching and learning?

Not if, but when: staying one step ahead of the cybercriminals 

Imagine waking up one morning and finding that you can’t access any of your systems. Or getting an email telling you that a stranger has stolen all your institution’s private data and they’ll release it in 24 hours unless you pay a ransom to get it back. This is the reality for hundreds of education professionals, with a rise in the number of cybercriminals making schools and universities targets of their illicit activities. Over four in ten institutions were victims of such attacks last year and, of those, a third chose to pay the ransom rather than risk data being leaked (Politico, 2021). With the average cost of replacing an IT system running into the millions of dollars, this is an area that leaders literally cannot afford to ignore. So how can you make your data and systems safer? And how can you educate your staff on protecting themselves and their workplace from such attacks?

Moderator

Jenny Anderson, Author & Host, Learnit Podcast (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Tony Moss, Director of Education and Student Experience, London South Bank University

Matt Britland, Director of IT and Digital Strategy, Alleyns School

Mental health and wellbeing

Covid shone a spotlight on mental health and wellness of both teachers and learners at every age. As a result, there has never been a greater focus on assessing and trying to improve wellbeing in education. Has this focus helped – and can it last?

The cause is the cure: digital learning and wellbeing

“It is clear that the time children spend both in and out of school on digital technologies is having a significant impact not only on their brains, minds and bodies, but also how they experience the world around them.” This quote, from a foreword to a report into the effect of digital technologies on children’s wellbeing (Gonski Institute for Education, 2020), shows that lockdown and hybrid learning could have a long-term impact on students’ approach to life and learning. With that in mind, how can we use digital tools to help young people’s mental health and academic participation?

Moderator

Sarah Cunnane, Content Director, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Kunal Kala, Founder & CEO, MindON (India)

KC Estenson, CEO, GoNoodle (United States)

Changing the
system

For years, education has seen a series of incremental tweaks to the way it operates. Covid has accelerated that change exponentially. Discover who’s been disrupting the school day, who has rethought ways to deliver education and who’s been questioning the way things have always been done.

To interdisciplinary, and beyond: rethinking the structure of learning 

A day broken into a series of discrete subject-based lessons is a familiar structure to most educators. But is this the best way to inspire students? Meet leaders from around the world who are using an interdisciplinary approach to give students links between subjects, to enhance learning, and maybe even improve teacher workload.

Moderator

Katy Fryatt, Founder, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Rohan Roberts, Director of Innovation & Future Learning, GEMS Education (United Arab Emirates)

Noemi Valencia, Co-Founder & Chief Learning & Inspiration Officer, Knotion (Mexico)

Carl Gombrich, Academic Lead and Head of Learning and Ed Fidoe, Chief Executive, The London Interdisciplinary School (United Kingdom)

Coffee break and networking

Keynote

Speaker detail to be announced

An educational philosophy

Susan Enfield

Superintendent 

Highline Schools (United States)

A global education perspective

Stefania Giannini

Deputy Director-General for Education

Unesco (France)

Lunch

First sitting

Coffee, pudding and networking

Lunch

Second sitting

Science of
learning

Evidence-based teaching and policy is now the norm in classrooms and governments across the world. From the immediate concern of catching up from learning lost during the pandemic to looking at novel ways to set up classrooms and learning to ensure future success, take a look at some new ideas to consider for schools, colleges and universities.

Redesigning learning for the adolescent brain 

How can we best leverage science to redesign adolescent learning? According to Ronald Dahl, “Adolescents crave mattering and we can help them by enabling them to do things that matter.”  Come learn about the latest research on designing learning for the developing brains of teenagers, from starting the school day later to the most effective ways to provide feedback.

Moderator

Jenny Anderson, Author & Host, Learnit Podcast (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Ronald Dahl, Director, Institute of Human Development, University of California Berkeley (United States)

David S Yeager, Co-Director and Co-Founder, Texas Behavioral Science and Policy Institute, University of Texas at Austin

Mental health and wellbeing

Covid shone a spotlight on mental health and wellness of both teachers and learners at every age. As a result, there has never been a greater focus on assessing and trying to improve wellbeing in education. Has this focus helped – and can it last?

Social and emotional learning: an idea whose time has come?

After a turbulent two years for many young people, students are suffering and social and emotional learning has landed on centre stage. Research shows that teaching students to form positive relationships and manage difficult relationships can improve behaviour and academic performance (CASEL). Detractors say that removing politics and socioeconomic realities from SEL curricula only teaches students to live with injustice rather than encouraging them to confront it. So, what is the current state of SEL, and what are schools doing to improve and evolve their offering to make it relevant to all students?

Moderator

Lord Jim Knight, Director, Suklaa (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Herminder K Channa, Executive Principal, Ark Schools (United Kingdom)

Changing the
system

For years, education has seen a series of incremental tweaks to the way it operates. Covid has accelerated that change exponentially. Discover who’s been disrupting the school day, who has rethought ways to deliver education and who’s been questioning the way things have always been done.

Inside the tutoring boom

Tutoring is having a golden moment, not just as a way to personalise learning for young people, but also as a strategy to help students catch up on learning lost during lockdown. Find out how the industry has evolved over the past two years, which edtech companies have emerged as the pandemic progressed and what impact tutoring is having on learner outcomes.

Moderator

Katy Fryatt, Founder, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Bertie Hubbard, Co-Founder & CEO, MyTutor (United Kingdom)

Michael Lombardo, CEO, BookNook

Rahim Hirji, UK Country Manager, Quizlet

Science of
learning

Evidence-based teaching and policy is now the norm in classrooms and governments across the world. From the immediate concern of catching up from learning lost during the pandemic to looking at novel ways to set up classrooms and learning to ensure future success, take a look at some new ideas to consider for schools, colleges and universities.

Upending the status
quo with cross-media
stories

This session upends standard practices, demonstrating the value of using stories that “cross” from one media format to another, as equal partners.You’ll experience cross-media methodology with a story that crosses from a play, Bachir Lazhar by Evelyne de Chenelière, to the Academy Award-nominated film adaptation, Monsieur Lazhar, by Philippe Falardeau:–the uplifting story of a French-Canadian elementary school reeling from a beloved teacher’s suicide, and a substitute teacher’s efforts to put shattered classroom lives back together.

Speakers

Susan Johnson McCabe, Director, X-Media Lab, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Randy M Testa, Associate Director, X-Media Lab, Harvard Graduate School of Education

The investment landscape

During the pandemic, universities have had their purpose challenged and scrutinised – whether that’s to students, to industry, to society or to other stakeholders. From debates over value for money to whether free speech is now limited on campus, higher education has found itself at the centre of a number of furores over its mission, its relevance and its value. So now, as things begin to return to a semblance of normality, what should the purpose of universities be? And what work are higher education institutions already doing to keep themselves relevant?

Whither the Dragon? Edtech’s future in China

In 2020, China attracted $10.2 billion of edtech venture capital, more than half of all money invested, and multiples more than the US ($2.5 billion) and India ($2.3 billion). It has constituted more than half of all funding since 2016. But new regulations meant to curb tutoring and limit the use of foreign teachers has dealt a blow to the sector. Why is China hampering its edtech giants, and what does that mean for the sector moving forward?

Moderator

Jenny Anderson, Author & Host, Learnit Podcast (United Kingdom)

Speakers

More speakers to follow

Changing the
system

For years, education has seen a series of incremental tweaks to the way it operates. Covid has accelerated that change exponentially. Discover who’s been disrupting the school day, who has rethought ways to deliver education and who’s been questioning the way things have always been done.

Reimagining the school day

The pandemic has shown us that school doesn’t have to happen between the hours of 8am and 3pm, or even in a school. Some leaders are redesigning how the school day is structured in terms of time, location, and how long students need to learn material.

Moderator

Katy Fryatt, Founder, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Ben Smith, Head of Research & Innovation, Chelsea Football Club (United Kingdom)

Jeff Wetzler, CEO, Transcend (United States)

Science of
learning

Evidence-based teaching and policy is now the norm in classrooms and governments across the world. From the immediate concern of catching up from learning lost during the pandemic to looking at novel ways to set up classrooms and learning to ensure future success, take a look at some new ideas to consider for schools, colleges and universities.

The biology of human potential, and what that means for schools

Moderator

Jenny Anderson, Author & Host, Learnit Podcast (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Pamela Cantor, Founder & Senior Science Advisor, Turnaround for Children (United States)

Higher education: who and what is it for?

During the pandemic, universities have had their purpose challenged and scrutinised – whether that’s to students, to industry, to society or to other stakeholders. From debates over value for money to whether free speech is now limited on campus, higher education has found itself at the centre of a number of furores over its mission, its relevance and its value. So now, as things begin to return to a semblance of normality, what should the purpose of universities be? And what work are higher education institutions already doing to keep themselves relevant?

Inside the
edtech boom

“For years we were the kids at the back of the classroom. Now we’re up there with fintech and health tech and mobility,” says Maia Sharpley, co-founder of Juvo Ventures and ex-partner at Learn Capital. From 2010 to 2020, edtech venture capital grew 32 times to $16.1 billion, with no signs of slowing down. Some, like Sharpley, say we are on the cusp of explosive growth. Others predict the sector will crash and burn. Our panel of investors weighs in on valuations, capital, exits and which sub-sectors are attracting the most money.

Moderator

Katy Fryatt, Founder, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Jan Lynn-Matern, Founder & Partner, Emerge Education (United Kingdom)

More speakers to follow

Equity
and access

The pandemic illuminated long-standing inequities of race, class and gender and many countries’ continued failure to close them. Covid may have energised attention to those gaps, but the pandemic clearly worsened them. What new methods, funding and programmes are being deployed and will they have better success?

Race and equity
in US classrooms

Debates over how race is taught in US classrooms are raging across the country with political parties embracing divisions to gain votes. From critical race theory to white privilege, everyone has an opinion on what to teach and what to ban. But how many of these opinions will help eradicate the stubborn predictability of race and attainment in US classrooms? We discuss critical race theory, freedom of speech and the role of anti-racist curricula in and out of the classroom.

Moderator

Sarah Cunnane, Content Director, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Kaya Henderson, CEO, Reconstruction.us (United States)

Susan Enfield, Superintendent, Highline Public Schools (United States)

Bion Bartning, Founder & CEO, FAIR (Foundation Against Intolerance and Racism)(United States)

Coffee break and networking

GESA Startup Awards

Hosted Leader Meetings

Connecting global educator leaders and technology companies through curated pre-selected, 1:1 meetings.

Learnit Lates with Sal Khan and Andreas Schleicher