AGENDA

EXCEL LONDON 

19-21 JANUARY 2022

For 2022, attendance at Learnit is prioritised for educator leaders taking part in our Hosted Leaders Programme. To find out more, check your eligibility and save your spot, visit the dedicated Hosted Leaders Programme page.

Registration open

Confirm your schedule for the day and opt into any additional activities

Breakfast is served

Hosted Leader Meetings

Connecting global educator leaders and technology companies through curated pre-selected, 1:1 meetings.

Keynote

Wendy Kopp

CEO & Co-founder

Teach for all (United States)

Keynote

Speaker detail to be announced

Keynote

Speaker detail to be announced

Keynote

Speaker detail to be announced

Assessment
 

The pandemic illuminated long-standing inequities of race, class and gender and many countries’ continued failure to close them. Covid may have energised attention to those gaps, but the pandemic clearly worsened them. What new methods, funding and programmes are being deployed and will they have better success?

OK, computer? The innovations and limits of AI assessment

As edtech becomes more sophisticated, more solutions are springing up that take the burden of marking/grading and assessment away from teachers. What options are currently out there for education leaders to consider? Will replacing teachers with AI lead to a more rigorous system, or a more biased one?

Moderator

Katy Fryatt, Founder, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Carl Gombrich, Academic Lead & Head of Learning, The London Interdiscplinary School (United Kingdom)

Arunabh Singh, Director and Principal, Nehru World School (India)

Higher education: who and what is it for?

During the pandemic, universities have had their purpose challenged and scrutinised – whether that’s to students, to industry, to society or to other stakeholders. From debates over value for money to whether free speech is now limited on campus, higher education has found itself at the centre of a number of furores over its mission, its relevance and its value. So now, as things begin to return to a semblance of normality, what should the purpose of universities be? And what work are higher education institutions already doing to keep themselves relevant?

Communiversities: what do universities owe their local area?

At its simplest, a university can be a large local employer. When working with other educational institutions, government and industry, a university can be part of a long-term plan to rejuvenate and improve its community. Either way, an HE institution has an impact on its local area. So how has the idea of civic duty for universities evolved over time – and what place should a university have in its local area?

Moderator

Sarah Cunnane, Content Director, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Hugh Martin, Registrar & Chief Administrative Officer, The British University in Dubai (United Arab Emirates) 

Derek Douglas, Vice President for Civic Engagement and External Affairs, University of Chicago (United States)

Julie Wells, Vice President (Strategy and Culture), University of Melbourne (Australia)

Equity and
access

Critics say one-time, high-stakes exams provide an incomplete picture of learners – and leave behind students deemed to have “failed”. Supporters say that while the system isn’t perfect, it’s still the most equitable tool available. Technologists say they can help the system improve. Have we got a once in a lifetime opportunity to drive an assessment revolution, and if so, what should it look like? What is the future of assessment or, perhaps more importantly, what should it be?

The lost boys:
tackling historical underachievement

Why do boys underachieve at school compared with girls? The last Programme for International Student Assessment revealed that three in 10 boys failed to reach proficiency level 2 in reading. Combined with the fact that boys are more likely to be less motivated to learn (Pisa 2018) and to have a poor attitude to learning (Mark Roberts, 2021), is there a quiet crisis here that is not being addressed as openly as it should be?

Moderator

Katy Fryatt, Founder, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Tim King, Founder President and CEO, Urban Prep Academies (United States)

More speakers to follow

Assessment
 

The pandemic illuminated long-standing inequities of race, class and gender and many countries’ continued failure to close them. Covid may have energised attention to those gaps, but the pandemic clearly worsened them. What new methods, funding and programmes are being deployed and will they have better success?

Identifying and
reducing bias in
assessments

All tests are written and assessed by human beings and so bias is unavoidable and inevitable, whether that’s based around gender, race, class or even the tests themselves. So how can we make sure that people are aware of their biases and prevent widening the attainment gap?

Speaker

Amy Jin Johnson, Executive Director, Project Implicit Inc (United States)

Building a curriculum for the future

We all know about the 3Rs and the 5Cs – the long-established set of skills our students are expected to have mastered before they leave education. But what comes next? Few agree what the essential skills our children need to learn are – and fewer still agree on how to teach them those skills. From climate education to social and emotional learning, see how leaders are redesigning curricula to meet the demands of modern life.

There’s no planet B:
why climate education can’t wait

Eighty per cent of the illnesses, injuries and deaths occurring due to climate change are in children. Find out what schools and universities are doing already to build climate education into their curricula, and how your school can become a greener place. 

Moderator

Lord Jim Knight, Director, Suklaa (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Alex Bell, Co-Creator & Facilitator Eden Project Changemaker Programme, The Eden Project (United Kingdom)

Sam Kendall, Education Manager, The Eden Project, (United Kingdom)

Rebecca Winthrop, Senior Fellow & Co-Director, Center for Universal Education at the Brookings Institution (United States)

Equity and
access

Critics say one-time, high-stakes exams provide an incomplete picture of learners – and leave behind students deemed to have “failed”. Supporters say that while the system isn’t perfect, it’s still the most equitable tool available. Technologists say they can help the system improve. Have we got a once in a lifetime opportunity to drive an assessment revolution, and if so, what should it look like? What is the future of assessment or, perhaps more importantly, what should it be?

Getting girls’
education back
on track

Before the pandemic, 130 million girls were already out of education (Unesco, 2021). Post-pandemic, Unesco estimates that a further 11 million will not make it back into the classroom. With high-profile examples of girls being excluded from basic education, including the Taliban denying girls access to schools and higher education, are we losing momentum in the fight for gender equality? And what can be done to help them achieve their greatest potential, given extensive school closures?

Moderator

Jenny Anderson, Author & Host, Learnit Podcast (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Robert Jenkins, Director, Education &  Adolescent Development, UNICEF (United States)

Rangina Hamidi, Professor of Practice, Thunderbird School of Management at ASU (United States)

Chernor Bah, Co-Founder & Co-CEO, Purposeful (Sierra Leone)

TBC
 

The pandemic illuminated long-standing inequities of race, class and gender and many countries’ continued failure to close them. Covid may have energised attention to those gaps, but the pandemic clearly worsened them. What new methods, funding and programmes are being deployed and will they have better success?

TBC

Moderator

TBC

Speakers

Speaker details to follow

Building a curriculum for the future

We all know about the 3Rs and the 5Cs – the long-established set of skills our students are expected to have mastered before they leave education. But what comes next? Few agree what the essential skills our children need to learn are – and fewer still agree on how to teach them those skills. From climate education to social and emotional learning, see how leaders are redesigning curricula to meet the demands of modern life.

Achieving parity of esteem for technical and vocational education

If you build it, you can’t guarantee that they will come. Many school systems around the world are still set up to funnel young people through the academic route to success, with vocational and technical education often seen as a second-choice or bolt-on option for post-16 learners. What can we learn from systems that have successfully integrated vocational education earlier – and how can we guide students to the right path for them?

Moderator

Sarah Cunnane, Content Director, Learnit (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Sasha Ratnam, Co-Founder, Tech Terrain College (Malaysia)

Neil Bentley-Gockmann, CEO, WorldSkills UK

Equity and
access

Critics say one-time, high-stakes exams provide an incomplete picture of learners – and leave behind students deemed to have “failed”. Supporters say that while the system isn’t perfect, it’s still the most equitable tool available. Technologists say they can help the system improve. Have we got a once in a lifetime opportunity to drive an assessment revolution, and if so, what should it look like? What is the future of assessment or, perhaps more importantly, what should it be?

What’s the future
for the low-cost private school model?

The pandemic has hit low-cost private schools particularly hard, with financial stresses on the system and high amounts of learning loss among students (Unicef, 2021). In this fireside chat, Alain Guy Tanefo and Aashti Zaidi Hai discuss what the future holds for low-cost private schools

Moderator

Jenny Anderson, Author & Host, Learnit Podcast (United Kingdom)

Speakers

Alain Guy Tanefo, Managing Director, Omega Schools (Ghana)

Aashti Zaidi Hai, CEO, Global Skills Forum (United Kingdom)

Lunch

Coffee, pudding and networking

Join the Learnit UnConference for a variety of discussion groups, creative workshops and sponsor-led activities

Debate: Do we need to change our behaviour on behaviour?

AJ Crabill

National Director of Governance

Council of the Great City Schools (United States)